Assistant Professor



Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact

McMaster University
1280 Main St. West,
HSC3V - 43B
Hamilton, Ontario ​L8S 4K1
Canada



Assistant Professor


Contact

Assistant Professor



Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact

McMaster University
1280 Main St. West,
HSC3V - 43B
Hamilton, Ontario ​L8S 4K1
Canada




About


Dr. Giulia Muraca is a perinatal epidemiologist and an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Health Research Methods, Evidence & Impact at McMaster University. Her research is in the area of maternal, fetal, and neonatal health and health services research, with emphasis on care quality, accessibility and equity. 

Dr. Muraca received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of British Columbia where her doctoral research characterized maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in deliveries requiring forceps, vacuum, and cesarean delivery. She completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Clinical Epidemiology Unit at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, where she developed epidemiologic approaches to identify optimal intrapartum intervention rates – such as the cesarean delivery rate or the rate of induction – that minimize the frequency of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes including postpartum hemorrhage, obstetric anal sphincter injury, maternal sepsis, neonatal sepsis, and birth injury.

Muraca Perinatal Epidemiology Research Lab (PERL)

The Muraca Perinatal Epidemiology Research  Lab (PERL) is part of the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact at McMaster University. 

The PERL specializes in linking and analyzing large datasets to improve safety and well-being for mothers and babies from the preconception period, during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period, and beyond throughout the mother and child's life course. 

Recent publications


Variation in Episiotomy Use Among Nulliparous Individuals by Maternity Care Provider and Associated Rates of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury.


Giulia M Muraca, Anvi Desai, Vanessa Hébert, G. Mann, Meejin Park, S. Lisonkova, K. S. Joseph

Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada, 2024


741 The association between hysterotomy extension and subsequent preterm birth


Giulia M. Muraca, Tzuria Peled, Abi Kirubarajan, A. Weiss, H. Sela, S. Grisaru-Granovsky, Misgav Rottenstreich

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2024


1042 Racial disparities in maternal transfusion in the United States by mode of delivery


Parnian Hossein Pour, Maya Rajasingham, Giulia M. Muraca

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2024


902 Impact of method of fetal extraction in second stage cesarean delivery on subsequent preterm delivery


Tzuria Peled, Giulia M. Muraca, Miri Ratner, H. Sela, Abi Kirubarajan, A. Weiss, S. Grisaru-Granovsky, Misgav Rottenstreich

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2024


Impacted fetal head extraction methods at second stage cesarean and subsequent preterm delivery: A multicenter study.


Tzuria Peled, Giulia M. Muraca, Miri Ratner, H. Sela, A. Kirubarajan, A. Weiss, S. Grisaru-Granovsky, Misgav Rottenstreich

International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, 2024


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Selected Projects




Asian-White disparities in obstetric anal sphincter injury


Studies from high-income countries have identified an increased risk of OASI in individuals who identify as Asian race vs those who identify as White; we are conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate this relationship.




Advancing equity in maternal and perinatal care in Canada: Population-based investigations of racial and ethnic disparities in severe maternal morbidity and severe perinatal morbidity and mortality


Previous studies suggest that racialized groups experience higher rates of severe maternal and perinatal outcomes; however, underlying causes of disparities in these outcomes among racial/ethnic groups remain unclear.




Investigating variation in cesarean delivery in Sweden and Canada using the Robson Ten Group Classification System


The Robson classification is a global standard for comparing cesarean delivery (CD) rates across populations; however, this classification does not account for differences in maternal, fetal, and obstetric practice factors known to impact CD rates.




Characterizing maternal and neonatal trauma associated with forceps and vacuum delivery


In Canada, rates of trauma following OVD are higher than previously reported, irrespective of region, level of obstetric care and volume of OVD among hospitals. These results support a reassessment of OVD safety in Canada.




Trends in second-stage cesarean delivery in Canada and associated maternal and perinatal morbidity


Trends in second stage cesarean delivery, forceps, vacuum have yet to be characterized and the impact of potential shifts in operative delivery use on maternal and perinatal morbidity rates has not been studied.


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