Assistant Professor



Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact

McMaster University
1280 Main St. West,
HSC3V - 43B
Hamilton, Ontario ​L8S 4K1
Canada



Obstetric Intervention and Perinatal Outcomes During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic


Journal article


Sophie Simon, Sid John, Sarka Lisonkova, Neda Razaz, Giulia M. Muraca, Amélie Boutin, Mohamed A. Bedaiwy, Justin S. Brandt, Cande Ananthy, KS Joseph
Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2023

Semantic Scholar DOI PubMedCentral PubMed
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APA   Click to copy
Simon, S., John, S., Lisonkova, S., Razaz, N., Muraca, G. M., Boutin, A., … Joseph, K. S. (2023). Obstetric Intervention and Perinatal Outcomes During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic. Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Chicago/Turabian   Click to copy
Simon, Sophie, Sid John, Sarka Lisonkova, Neda Razaz, Giulia M. Muraca, Amélie Boutin, Mohamed A. Bedaiwy, Justin S. Brandt, Cande Ananthy, and KS Joseph. “Obstetric Intervention and Perinatal Outcomes During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic.” Obstetrics and Gynecology (2023).


MLA   Click to copy
Simon, Sophie, et al. “Obstetric Intervention and Perinatal Outcomes During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic.” Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2023.


BibTeX   Click to copy

@article{sophie2023a,
  title = {Obstetric Intervention and Perinatal Outcomes During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic},
  year = {2023},
  journal = {Obstetrics and Gynecology},
  author = {Simon, Sophie and John, Sid and Lisonkova, Sarka and Razaz, Neda and Muraca, Giulia M. and Boutin, Amélie and Bedaiwy, Mohamed A. and Brandt, Justin S. and Ananthy, Cande and Joseph, KS}
}

Abstract

The onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was associated with a transient decrease in obstetric intervention and an increase in perinatal mortality. OBJECTIVE: To quantify pandemic-related changes in obstetric intervention and perinatal outcomes in the United States. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective study of all live births and fetal deaths in the United States, 2015–2021, with data obtained from the natality, fetal death, and linked live birth–infant death files of the National Center for Health Statistics. Analyses were carried out among all singletons; singletons of patients with prepregnancy diabetes, prepregnancy hypertension, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; and twins. Outcomes of interest included preterm birth, preterm labor induction or preterm cesarean delivery, macrosomia, postterm birth, and perinatal death. Interrupted time series analyses were used to estimate changes in the prepandemic period (January 2015–February 2020), at pandemic onset (March 2020), and in the pandemic period (March 2020–December 2021). RESULTS: The study population included 26,604,392 live births and 155,214 stillbirths. The prepandemic period was characterized by temporal increases in preterm birth and preterm labor induction or cesarean delivery rates and temporal reductions in macrosomia, postterm birth, and perinatal mortality. Pandemic onset was associated with absolute decreases in preterm birth (decrease of 0.322/100 live births, 95% CI 0.506–0.139) and preterm labor induction or cesarean delivery (decrease of 0.190/100 live births, 95% CI 0.334–0.047) and absolute increases in macrosomia (increase of 0.046/100 live births), postterm birth (increase of 0.015/100 live births), and perinatal death (increase of 0.501/1,000 total births, 95% CI 0.220–0.783). These changes were larger in subpopulations at high risk (eg, among singletons of patients with prepregnancy diabetes). Among singletons of patients with prepregnancy diabetes, pandemic onset was associated with a decrease in preterm birth (decrease of 1.634/100 live births) and preterm labor induction or cesarean delivery (decrease of 1.521/100 live births) and increases in macrosomia (increase of 0.328/100 live births) and perinatal death (increase of 9.840/1,000 total births, 95% CI 3.933–15.75). Most changes were reversed in the months after pandemic onset. CONCLUSION: The onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was associated with a transient decrease in obstetric intervention (especially preterm labor induction or cesarean delivery) and a transient increase in perinatal mortality.


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